Featured Articles

The following links will take you to PDF files of some of the articles featured in past issues of Elevation. These articles should not be reproduced without permission.


Adsimulo – The Next Generation ‘Lift Design Application’ has arrived…

AdSimulo is a truly revolutionary lift design application for architects, building services engineers, lift designers and consultants.
It guides the user simply and seamlessly through the steps of assembling the necessary design requirements, which can be as simple as inputting just six variables, to getting “optimal” lift design solutions (those that take the least space out of the building) and providing all the necessary design reports for the solution as well as a generic BIM model that will suit all manufacturers.
Using the power of ‘cloud computing’ combined with the world’s only ‘expert system’ for lift design, this on-line application does everything that architects and engineers need for lift planning; reducing design timescales from days, weeks or even months to minutes.

SPECIAL READER OFFER: Use discount code “Elevation” to receive an initial 10% discount on your Adsimulo subscription.


Download a full PDF copy of the article here.

The New Apprenticeship Training Levy

by Ish Buckingham
L.I.T.S. Limited recently invited me to a Seminar, which dealt with the subject of Apprenticeship reforms that will affect employers of all sizes.
Large employers, with an annual pay bill of more than £3m, should already be aware that they will have to pay an Apprenticeship Levy from April 2017.

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Pickerings Lifts – 160 years serving the Industry

Pickerings Lifts – 160 years serving the Industry

By Ish Buckingham

My trip to the North East naturally drew me to Pickerings Lifts, the UK’s largest independent lift manufacturer; with headquarters in Stockton-on-Tees, Pickerings Lifts is celebrating its 160th anniversary this year.

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Where are the world’s most impressive elevators?

Where are the world’s most impressive elevators?

By Kirk Lawson, Sales & Marketing Director of Pickerings Lifts.

The main purpose of a lift or elevator is to allow
people to get from one floor to another quickly with
speed and ease, but needless to say it’s often a
pretty mundane journey within the familiar four walls.
So how do specifiers who are designing high footfall
buildings around the world – whether ambitious,
innovative structures, tourist attractions or heritage
buildings - manage to incorporate the humble lift into
their architectural plans?

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Elevator Attraction at the Museu Benfica

Elevator Attraction at the Museu Benfica

By Ish Buckingham
The lift industry is currently devoting a great deal of time and dare I say energy, into developing ‘green’ products that will contribute to the global objective of preserving our planet for future generations. The general trend is to find ways of reducing rather than eliminating the use of electrical power.

I was therefore intrigued to say the least when I heard about a solar/water powered lift, which had been installed for a two week period at a prestigious location in London as part of the London Festival of Architecture 2010 – the UK’s largest celebration of architecture, which took place between 19th June and 4th July.

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Chiswick Tower

Chiswick Tower

by Ray Davies - Managing Director of de Graaff & Partners
Few buildings pose greater head scratching moments for lift designers than ones that are situated directly above a London Underground station, especially when, at peak periods, the vast majority of people leaving that station are travelling to the building in question. Fortunately there aren’t too many of these buildings about, but the very prestigious Chiswick Tower is certainly one of note. The inrush of passenger traffic at peak times, when a tube train arrives, really can be a sight to behold and inevitably puts an enormous strain on the capacity of the waiting lift lobby. Couple this significant factor with the fact that the building does not have any stairs located near the lifts; with the only ones available above the first floor being at the far East and West extremities of the building, and you have the basis of a vertical transportation system that is certainly going to be challenging at the very best...
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Emirates

Emirates

By Eur Ing David Cooper BSc(Hons), MSc, MPhil, CEng, FIET, FCIBSE
The Emirates Air Line is the UK’s first urban cable car, it provides a low-emission, quick, direct and fully accessible link across the River Thames, travelling between two new terminals named Emirates Greenwich Peninsula and Emirates Royal Docks. It was completed in June 2012 and is the winner of the Elevator World Project of the Year 2013 Award in the Automated People Mover category.
The project was commissioned by TfL via DLR and David Cooper of LECS (UK) was appointed as technical advisor to the Department for Transport.
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Duke of York Steps Lift

Duke of York Steps Lift

By Ish Buckingham
The lift industry is currently devoting a great deal of time and dare I say energy, into developing ‘green’ products that will contribute to the global objective of preserving our planet for future generations. The general trend is to find ways of reducing rather than eliminating the use of electrical power.

I was therefore intrigued to say the least when I heard about a solar/water powered lift, which had been installed for a two week period at a prestigious location in London as part of the London Festival of Architecture 2010 – the UK’s largest celebration of architecture, which took place between 19th June and 4th July.

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The Levytator

The Levytator

A Multi-Curving New Dimension in Escalators
by Prof Jack Levy OBE FIMechE
The moving stairway or ‘escalator’ as we know it was invented by Charles Seeberger in 1897 and in principle has changed little since then. A basic feature is that the return path is underneath the usable steps. Of course there have been improvements; for example in the driving mechanism and the handrail, but the 2-dimensional character has not changed. Fig. 2 shows the new ‘Levytator’ concept. In contrast to the existing design the steps are in a loop and the installation is now 3-dimensional. This means savings in cost because no excavation is necessary and virtually all steps are in action all the time. Also, maintenance can be carried out much more easily - all from the top. Anyone who has seen the difficulties, for example on the London Underground, when an escalator requires overhaul or maintenance will appreciate the advantage….

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